Outstanding contribution by Volunteer Rangers recognised by leading outdoor retailer

Rohan recognising NT volunteers (c) National Trust

In recognition of the outstanding contribution that countryside volunteer rangers have made to the conservation of the Holnicote Estate, Rohan Ltd have generously sponsored every volunteer who has completed more than 50 hours volunteering during the past year. Continue reading…

Celebrate 200 years of Wellington Monument

Wellington Monument (c) National Trust/Fran Stothard

 

This October, the National Trust will be celebrating 200 years since the laying of the foundation stone at Wellington Monument with a special event on 21 October. Together with partners from the Blackdown Hills AONB and ActionTrack performance company, they will be presenting an evening performance and community celebration for all of the locals. Continue reading…

Wall-Tile replacement at Max Gate

Max Gate wall tie work (c) National Trust Martin Stephen

Thomas Hardy’s Dorchester home, Max Gate, is having a facelift. The original wall ties, put in by the writer more than 130 years ago, have rusted through and are now causing the brickwork to crack and are being replaced by the National Trust building team.  The work will be happening on selected days throughout the summer and early autumn, giving visitors the opportunity to see this vital conservation work in action. Continue reading…

17th-century well restored at Coleridge Cottage

National Trust volunteer Ian Faris, stands next to the newly restored well at Coleridge Cottage (c) National Trust / Dave Wood

Visitors to Coleridge Cottage in Nether Stowey, Somerset, are now able to draw water from the building’s original Georgian well following its restoration. The well, which is 16 metres (over 52 feet) deep, was built in the 1640s at the same time as the cottage. Thanks to the help of visitors who bought raffle tickets to raise money, the well can now be returned to its former use. Continue reading…

Have archaeologists found a lost mansion of Devon at Killerton?

Archaeologists working with the National Trust’s Killerton estate believe they may have found the location of the lost Killerton mansion that was started in 1775, but never completed.

The lost house was re-discovered almost by accident. Rumours of the mansion, three times bigger than the surviving building at Killerton and more befitting of the Acland family’s wealth and status, have circulated for many years – but no-one has been able to find where the building work was located. All that has remained of the mansion are designs by renowned architect, James Wyatt, a few surviving records and three theories about why it was never completed nearly 240 years ago. Continue reading…

Bristol’s ancient trees to be protected thanks to a generous donation from SC Johnson

National Trust Ranger Janine Connor carrying out a condition survey (c) National Trust / Barry Batchelor

Some of the most important trees in the country, which grow within sight of Bristol, are to be conserved by conservation charity, the National Trust, thanks to support from SC Johnson.

The collection of ancient and veteran trees can be found across a number of Bristol and North Somerset places – including Leigh Woods, Tyntesfield, Shirehampton Park, Failand and Clevedon Court – and consists of one of the largest populations of ancient and veteran trees in the South West. Ancient trees of this kind, which are usually between 150 and 900 years old, are uncommon, under threat, and in need of specialist conservation to ensure their survival. Continue reading…

Edwardian engine runs for the first time in 100 years

Engine awaiting restoration, Brownsea Island (c)National Trust/Phil Pickering

An exceptional example of British Edwardian engineering has been brought back to working order by a team of highly skilled and dedicated volunteers, working with the National Trust at Brownsea Island in Poole Harbour, Dorset. The engine dates back from around 1907 and it is thought to be the only one of its kind to remain in its original location in the former engine house on Brownsea Island.  Originally installed to supply electricity to Brownsea Castle, the engine sat derelict for decades, its glory of olden days stripped away and in pieces.

Members of the team involved in the restoration of the Engine at Brownsea Island ©National Trust/Adam Poole

Members of the team involved in the restoration of the Engine at Brownsea Island ©National Trust/Adam Poole

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The National Trust outlines ambition to help restore Britain’s natural heritage

Large Blue Butterfly ©National Trust Images. Matthew Oates

The National Trust today outlined ambitious plans to help reverse the decline in wildlife on all land in its ownership – including an aim to create 25,000 hectares (at least 5000 in the South West) of new habitats by 2025.

As one of the country’s largest landowners, the Trust wants to play its part in addressing the dramatic slump in British species and improve soil quality and water quality in the countryside. An in-depth study of UK species last year found 56 per cent were in decline.

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