17th-century well restored at Coleridge Cottage

National Trust volunteer Ian Faris, stands next to the newly restored well at Coleridge Cottage (c) National Trust / Dave Wood

Visitors to Coleridge Cottage in Nether Stowey, Somerset, are now able to draw water from the building’s original Georgian well following its restoration. The well, which is 16 metres (over 52 feet) deep, was built in the 1640s at the same time as the cottage. Thanks to the help of visitors who bought raffle tickets to raise money, the well can now be returned to its former use. Continue reading…

Have archaeologists found a lost mansion of Devon at Killerton?

Archaeologists working with the National Trust’s Killerton estate believe they may have found the location of the lost Killerton mansion that was started in 1775, but never completed.

The lost house was re-discovered almost by accident. Rumours of the mansion, three times bigger than the surviving building at Killerton and more befitting of the Acland family’s wealth and status, have circulated for many years – but no-one has been able to find where the building work was located. All that has remained of the mansion are designs by renowned architect, James Wyatt, a few surviving records and three theories about why it was never completed nearly 240 years ago. Continue reading…

Bristol’s ancient trees to be protected thanks to a generous donation from SC Johnson

National Trust Ranger Janine Connor carrying out a condition survey (c) National Trust / Barry Batchelor

Some of the most important trees in the country, which grow within sight of Bristol, are to be conserved by conservation charity, the National Trust, thanks to support from SC Johnson.

The collection of ancient and veteran trees can be found across a number of Bristol and North Somerset places – including Leigh Woods, Tyntesfield, Shirehampton Park, Failand and Clevedon Court – and consists of one of the largest populations of ancient and veteran trees in the South West. Ancient trees of this kind, which are usually between 150 and 900 years old, are uncommon, under threat, and in need of specialist conservation to ensure their survival. Continue reading…

Edwardian engine runs for the first time in 100 years

Engine awaiting restoration, Brownsea Island (c)National Trust/Phil Pickering

An exceptional example of British Edwardian engineering has been brought back to working order by a team of highly skilled and dedicated volunteers, working with the National Trust at Brownsea Island in Poole Harbour, Dorset. The engine dates back from around 1907 and it is thought to be the only one of its kind to remain in its original location in the former engine house on Brownsea Island.  Originally installed to supply electricity to Brownsea Castle, the engine sat derelict for decades, its glory of olden days stripped away and in pieces.

Members of the team involved in the restoration of the Engine at Brownsea Island ©National Trust/Adam Poole

Members of the team involved in the restoration of the Engine at Brownsea Island ©National Trust/Adam Poole

Continue reading…

The National Trust outlines ambition to help restore Britain’s natural heritage

Large Blue Butterfly ©National Trust Images. Matthew Oates

The National Trust today outlined ambitious plans to help reverse the decline in wildlife on all land in its ownership – including an aim to create 25,000 hectares (at least 5000 in the South West) of new habitats by 2025.

As one of the country’s largest landowners, the Trust wants to play its part in addressing the dramatic slump in British species and improve soil quality and water quality in the countryside. An in-depth study of UK species last year found 56 per cent were in decline.

Continue reading…

£1m boost to Wellington Monument’s future in Autumn Statement

Wellington Monument Illuminated (c)NationalTrust/FranStothard

Wellington Monument Illuminated (c)NationalTrust/FranStothard

A £1 million grant has been awarded towards urgent repairs of the Wellington Monument by earlier today.
The money, announced by Chancellor Philip Hammond’s in his first Autumn Statement, comes from fines levied on the banking industry for manipulating the LIBOR rate. The government committed £102 million over the next 4 years to support good causes – with £1 million going to the repairs of the Wellington Monument.
Andy Semple, Assistant Director of Operations for the Trust in Somerset & Gloucestershire, explains: ‘This is an incredible start to our fundraising. We have been working hard over the past year to understand why the structure is deteriorating and to talk to local people about why it’s so important to them.
‘It will be 200 years next October since the foundation stone was laid and today’s news is hopefully an important step in safeguarding the Monument for the next 200 years for the benefit of the nation.’
Rebecca Pow MP says: ‘I am absolutely thrilled that the National Trust has been awarded £1 million of Libor funding for the restoration of our much loved Wellington Monument.
‘For over a year I have been working with the National Trust and the whole community on the campaign to restore the Monument and over the last week I have been stepping up the pressure.  I have personally stressed to both the Chancellor and the Chief Secretary to the Treasury the importance of this commemorative structure internationally, nationally and crucially locally making it clear just what it would  mean to see it restored to its full former glory.

L-R Helen Sharp, Rebecca Simon Larkins, Rebecca Pow

L-R Helen Sharp, Project Manager; Simon Larkins, General Manager and Rebecca Pow MP (C)Rebecca Pow

‘The awarding of these funds is testament to the hard work of the National Trust, the thousands of people who signed my parliamentary petition, the newly crowned local monument champions and everyone else who has shown support for the cause.’
This funding gives the project a huge boost. The next step is for the National Trust to submit their first round application to the Heritage Lottery Fund in a couple of week’s time towards the £3million still needed to raise for the project to go ahead.
The Trust would like to thank Rebecca Pow as the Libor Funding was made possible through her support and commitment to the project.