Horse power at Tyntesfield

Tuppence the horse logging

A heavy horse has been drafted in to help with the extension of a National Trust woodland play area at Tyntesfield, near Bristol.

The building work has already begun, but Tuppence, a 14 hand Welsh Cob, is due to join the site from Monday 18 April to Wednesday 20 April to help haul timber. The logs she will be moving were felled at Tyntesfield; they measure approximately 28 ft. long and will be used for edging in the play area. Continue reading…

National Trust puts cider apples at its core

George Holmes, Area Ranger in South Somerset, planting a cider tree from the collection (c) Steve Haywood

An internationally important collection of cider apples, with almost 300 different varieties, has been given to the National Trust and will be planted in orchards at Montacute House, Barrington Court, Tyntesfield and Glastonbury in Somerset, Golden Cap in Dorset, Westbury Court Garden in Gloucestershire, Killerton in Devon and Brockhampton in Herefordshire. Continue reading…

Where shall we go today?

There’s over 200 gardens to explore with the National Trust, that’s a lot of choice. If you’re feeling stuck for somewhere to visit, or want help narrowing the choice use our handy flowchart. Perfect for the indecisive garden lover…

Click on the flowchart to expand.

National Trust spring gardens 2015

Like to know more about what’s on offer during spring 2015 at Glendurgan Garden, Arlington Court, Barrington Court, Stourhead, Godolphin and Greenway?

Visit our guide on these spring gardens.

Glendurgan magnolias in top form 25 years after great storm

John Lanyon (Garden Manager) & Charles Fox ( Whose family gave Glendurgan to the National Trust in 1962 reflecting on the magnolia flowers this year.  Since the Great Storm 25 years ago that wiped out over 70 trees in a matter of hours, the Magnolias have flourished and due to losing the surrounding trees, and are set to put on a magnificient display this year

John Lanyon (Garden Manager) & Charles Fox ( Whose family gave Glendurgan to the National Trust in 1962) reflecting on the magnolia flowers this year. Since the Great Storm 25 years ago that wiped out over 70 trees in a matter of hours, the Magnolias have flourished and due to losing the surrounding trees, and are set to put on a magnificient display this year

The gardeners at the National Trust’s Glendurgan near Falmouth have been reflecting on how the 25-acre valley garden has changed since the great storm of 1990. On January 25 that year seventy trees blew over in a matter of hours. Far from being a disaster, the events of that day proved transformational for the garden. Having suddenly lost many of their surrounding woodland companions, the tree-sized flowering magnolias have turned the extra light, moisture and nutrients into eye-catching flowering each March.

Continue reading…

17% more flowers make for a blooming Valentine

Simon Akeroyd Head Gardener at Coleton Fishacre counting the Narcissus 'Rijnveld's Early Sensation' (the daffodil)

Simon Akeroyd Head Gardener at Coleton Fishacre counting the Narcissus ‘Rijnveld’s Early Sensation’ (the daffodil)

The Snowdrop has been voted the top spring flower in the South West, with the gardens at Cotehele, Stourhead and Killerton being the most popular places to see spring blooms.

This year’s milder, calmer and less wet winter compared with 2014 has been much kinder on our garden plants as gardeners have been finding out while taking part in the Trust’s annual Valentines Flower Count. Continue reading…

Weeding to the extreme – keeping the castle walls tidy

Gardeners abseiling St Michael's Mount in Cornwall

Gardeners abseiling St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall

Having a head for heights is a pre-requisite for the four strong team of gardeners at St Michaels Mount, located just off the south Cornwall coast.

As part of the work to conserve the 12th Century castle, the granite stone walls need weeding three times each year to ensure the walls are constantly kept clear.

Continue reading…

Harry’s Story tells how the First World War changed the future for Stourhead

Sir Henry, Harry and Lady Hoare

Sir Henry, Harry and Lady Hoare

Harry Hoare was a young man born to inherit his family’s country estate and trained to manage it, but his privilege brought with it the responsibility that the estate should be used so others could enjoy the beauty as well. The place was Stourhead but the time, just before the First World War, was to cause the shattering of the plans and dreams of the Hoare family.

Harry’s Story is now being told across Stourhead by the National Trust to show how war affected the lives of the Hoare family and many others who lived and worked on the estate. But the story also shows how Harry’s mother Alda, opened up the house and estate for soldiers recuperating from their injuries at a military hospital nearby.

Continue reading…

Making Saltram fit for the future

Family visitors in the garden at Saltram, Devon.

For almost 60 years the National Trust has cared for Saltram and welcomed hundreds of thousands of people into its splendid Georgian house and surrounding 180 hectares of Grade II listed parkland.

Just 3.5 miles out of Plymouth, the number of people spending time in this tranquil place has almost trebled in the last 25 years, and now vital work is planned to not only safeguard the future of this historic site but also to make everyone’s visit as enjoyable as possible.

Continue reading…

Work starts to save Stourhead’s Pantheon

Stourhead Pantheon (c) National Trust / Allan King

Stourhead Pantheon (c) National Trust / Allan King

Work has started to restore the Pantheon, perhaps the most important feature in the world-famous landscape gardens at the National Trust’s Stourhead in Wiltshire

Scaffolding now clads the building and the restoration team are making a start to repair the building’s roof – putting right damage caused by water leaks – and to restore some of the stonework. Continue reading…