Wall-Tile replacement at Max Gate

Max Gate wall tie work (c) National Trust Martin Stephen

Thomas Hardy’s Dorchester home, Max Gate, is having a facelift. The original wall ties, put in by the writer more than 130 years ago, have rusted through and are now causing the brickwork to crack and are being replaced by the National Trust building team.  The work will be happening on selected days throughout the summer and early autumn, giving visitors the opportunity to see this vital conservation work in action. Continue reading…

A new natural play trail opens at Leigh Woods in Bristol

A new play trail has opened at Leigh Woods near Bristol, cared for by conservation charity the National Trust. The trail uses natural materials and includes a range of separate activities to encourage families to explore more of the woodland, which forms part of the Avon Gorge Site of Special Scientific Interest. Continue reading…

17th-century well restored at Coleridge Cottage

National Trust volunteer Ian Faris, stands next to the newly restored well at Coleridge Cottage (c) National Trust / Dave Wood

Visitors to Coleridge Cottage in Nether Stowey, Somerset, are now able to draw water from the building’s original Georgian well following its restoration. The well, which is 16 metres (over 52 feet) deep, was built in the 1640s at the same time as the cottage. Thanks to the help of visitors who bought raffle tickets to raise money, the well can now be returned to its former use. Continue reading…

Have archaeologists found a lost mansion of Devon at Killerton?

Archaeologists working with the National Trust’s Killerton estate believe they may have found the location of the lost Killerton mansion that was started in 1775, but never completed.

The lost house was re-discovered almost by accident. Rumours of the mansion, three times bigger than the surviving building at Killerton and more befitting of the Acland family’s wealth and status, have circulated for many years – but no-one has been able to find where the building work was located. All that has remained of the mansion are designs by renowned architect, James Wyatt, a few surviving records and three theories about why it was never completed nearly 240 years ago. Continue reading…

A Spanish visitor to Kingston Lacy

A unique landscape by artist Diego Velázquez, painted for King Philip IV of Spain, has left the National Gallery in London for the first time, to be exhibited at the National Trust’s Kingston Lacy in Dorset. – Miranda Terry Conservation Assistant pictured

A unique landscape by artist Diego Velázquez, painted for King Philip IV of Spain, is on loan from the National Gallery in London for the first time, and is exhibited at the National Trust’s Kingston Lacy in Dorset. Continue reading…