Thousands of pink bottles washed up on Cornish coast

Pink bottles Poldhu beach - 5 1 15 - Credit Poldhu Beach Cafe

On January 4 2016, thousands of bright pink detergent bottles have been washed up on Poldhu beach on the Lizard Peninsula, part of the West Cornwall coastline cared for by the National Trust. 

Justin Whitehouse, National Trust Lead Ranger on the Lizard Peninsula, said: “We were alerted to the bottles yesterday and started collecting them straight away, with the aid of our staff and volunteers including those from the Friends of Poldhu Community Group, to remove them from the coastal environment as quickly as possible.  We urge people not to pick up any bottles without using protective gloves, keep animals away and avoid swimming or walking in the area until any risk from the detergent to human or animal health has been assessed. Continue reading…

BioBlitz at Sandymouth near Bude

godrevy-bioblitz17As part of the National Trust’s aim of completing the largest ever survey of its coastal wildlife, local rangers, experts and volunteers are heading to Sandymouth on Saturday 3rd October.

BioBlitzes took place at Brownsea Island in Dorset and Godrevy near Hayle in June with Sandymouth becoming the third site in the South West to host a BioBlitz, a race against the clock involving members of the public to record as many different species as possible.

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Nationally important bat roost discovered at Penrose

Greater Horseshoe Bat picture taken by Daniel Hargreaves www.bats.org.uk

Greater Horseshoe Bat picture taken by Daniel Hargreaves www.bats.org.uk

The Greater Horseshoe bat has established a nursery roost in a disused barn on the National Trust’s Penrose estate this summer.

This endangered bat only numbers approximately 5000 individuals in the UK and is restricted to the mild climates of south west England and south Wales. This new site is only the 5th and most southerly recorded nursery roost for this species in Cornwall and is of national conservation importance.

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In search of The Lizard’s lost shipwrecked souls

 

The view across Pistil Cove, where we believe the bodies were dragged up, and the rocks where The Royal Anne was wrecked. Photo by Michael Hirst

The view across Pistil Cove, where we believe the bodies were dragged up, and the rocks where The Royal Anne was wrecked. Photo by Michael Hirst

Recent survey work has brought archaeologists closer to solving a 300 year old shipwreck mystery at Lizard Point.

In November 1721, 207 unfortunate sailors lost their lives in a ferocious storm when their military transport galley the Royal Anne hit rocks and sank off Lizard Point. Just three people survived that fateful night by clinging to wreckage. Among the dead was Lord Belhaven the newly appointed Governor of Barbados, who was leaving Britain’s shores to take up the posting in mysterious circumstances after the untimely death of his wife.

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Hundreds of competitors world-wide made annual pilgrimage to Chapel Porth for the World Bellyboard Championships

 

Pictures By Steven Haywood - World Belly Boarding Competition 2015 held at National Trust's Chapel Porth Beach, Cornwall UK.

Pictures By Steven Haywood – World Belly Boarding Competition 2015 held at National Trust’s Chapel Porth Beach, Cornwall UK.

Sunday saw hundreds of participants make their way to the spiritual home of the World Bellyboard Championships at Chapel Porth, nr St Agnes in Cornwall, for the 13th National Trust World Bellyboard Championships.

The simple and gentle pastime of Bellyboarding, popular on the Cornish coast for over a hundred years has seen generations of prone wooden surfboard enthusiasts revel in the thrill of being pushed shore wards at great speed by a breaking Atlantic wave.

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Competitors world-wide make annual pilgrimage for the World Bellyboard Championships

Excitement is building at the spiritual home of the World Bellyboard Championships at Chapel Porth, nr St Agnes in Cornwall.

Organised and hosted by the National Trust, Chapel Porth is the venue for the annual vintage event which this year takes place on Sunday 6th September, and entry numbers are, as ever, in their hundreds.

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St Austell Brewery launches limited edition beer for the National Trust’s Coastline campaign.

Pictures By Steven Haywood - Nick Lawrence (National Trust South West Coast Director)  & Managing Director of St Austell Brewery James Staunton at The Gribbin, the namesake of the Limited Edition Ale that has been produced to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the National Trust's Coastline fundraising campaign 'Neptune' and St Austell Brewery giving the National Trust the Cornish Headland 'The Gribbin'

Pictures By Steven Haywood – Nick Lawrence (National Trust South West Coast Director) & Managing Director of St Austell Brewery James Staughton at The Gribbin, the namesake of the Limited Edition Ale that has been produced to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the National Trust’s Coastline fundraising campaign ‘Neptune’ and St Austell Brewery giving the National Trust the Cornish Headland ‘The Gribbin’

In 1965 the National Trust launched the Neptune Coastline Campaign to protect the coast from the threat of development and look after it for the nation for ever.

That same year, St Austell Brewery chairman Egbert Barnes included a passionate postscript in his annual company statement. It read: ‘May I commend to shareholders’ generosity the National Trust’s Enterprise Neptune to save as much as possible of what is left of the country’s coastline? Nowhere is that more important than it is in Cornwall.’

Following words with actions, in 1966 Mr Barnes and the Brewery helped to buy and give to the Trust a headland called The Gribbin to the west of Fowey Harbour on the edge of St Austell Bay. Mr Barnes was particularly fond of The Gribbin, as it formed the distant view from the Brewery boardroom, and by giving it to the Trust he could secure it for ever from development.

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Cornish coast puts on summer show

Lucy Parkins strolls through West Pentire wild flower meadow

Lucy Parkins strolls through West Pentire wild flower meadow

Weasel’s snout, Venus’s looking glass, small-flowered catchfly…as summer unfolds one of the south west’s rarest natural spectacles comes into its own along the north Cornish coast.

Carefully managed for nature and people by the National Trust, the West Pentire arable fields near Newquay are exploding in a riot of red poppies and yellow corn marigolds – but also creating a much-needed haven for some of the most endangered wild flowers in the country.

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