Stourhead restores Alexander Pope Quote

Pictures By Steven Haywood - The recarving an Alexander Poper inscription at the Grotto at National Trust's Stourhead Grotto, -using the traditional methods and tools.

The National Trust team at Stourhead, in Wiltshire, are working with experts from Cliveden Conservation to restore the worn lettering to a quote written by Alexander Pope in the first half of the 18th century and carved into the curved marble slab situated in the Grotto [1].

The recarving an Alexander Poper inscription at the Grotto at National Trust's Stourhead Grotto (c)National Trust/Steven Haywood

The recarving an Alexander Pope inscription at the Grotto at National Trust’s Stourhead Grotto (c)National Trust/Steven Haywood

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Stourhead comes alive with a tree top performance

Dramatic performance by Whispering Woods at Stourhead (c)National Trust/Martin Tompkins

This autumn the National Trust at Stourhead, Wiltshire, is hosting an aerial performance of ‘Red Threads’ by the talented Whispering Wood Folk.

The event, taking place on the 16 October at 2pm, will welcome the arrival of autumn and celebrate the wonderful display that nature creates in the Stourhead garden during the season.

Dramatic performance by Whispering Woods at Stourhead (c)National Trust/Martin Tompkins

Dramatic performance by Whispering Wood Folk at Stourhead (c)National Trust/Martin Tompkins

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Eye Tracking comes to Stourhead

Scientists from the ‘Eye Tracking Collective.landscape architecture’ at the Osnabrueck University of Applied Sciences in Germany are working with the National Trust’s Stourhead in Wiltshire to study how visitors to the world-famous garden interact with the landscape around them.

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Eye Tracking glasses inside the Pantheon, Stourhead (c)National Trust/Steven Haywood

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Citizen science project on BBC Countryfile

Ellie Harrison from BBC Countryfile and Lorraine Munns, a Bournemouth University student who did a research Msc on wood ants and silver studded blue butterflies which was part funded by a Cyril Diver project bursary

This weekend the National Trust’s Cyril Diver Project will feature on BBC1’s Countryfile.

Ellie Harrison, a presenter on the hit BBC show, visited the National Trust’s Purbeck Estate in Dorset earlier this month to learn about the Cyril Diver Project, a ground breaking citizen science project which has seen more than 200 volunteers surveying wildlife and plants on the South Haven Peninsula.

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Timbers washed up on beach may be from historic Swash channel wreck

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Stewart Rainbird and Joe Ahvee with the piece of wood, possibly from the Swash Channel wreckage ©National Trust

 

Timbers found by National Trust rangers on Studland Beach after Storm Katie swept through may be from the wreck of a 17th-century Dutch ship which has excited experts since its discovery in 1990.

The so-called Swash Channel wreck, near the entrance to Poole Harbour, has been described as the most significant maritime archaeology project in Britain since the raising of the Mary Rose in 1982.

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Care of Dorset nature reserves

Hambledon Hill, Dorset. The hill is a prehistoric hill fort and National Nature Reserve, situated in the Blackmore Vale, near Blandford Forum.

Hambledon Hill, Dorset. The hill is a prehistoric hill fort and National Nature Reserve, situated in the Blackmore Vale, near Blandford Forum.

 

The National Trust has now taken management control of three National Nature Reserves in Dorset.

The National Trust and Natural England have a long history of partnership working on these and many other sites and visitors are unlikely to notice much difference on the ground.  The National Nature Reserve accolade, which is conferred by Natural England, confirms that the National Trust has the required expertise and resources to manage these sites to the highest standards and has committed to continue to do so.

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Ground-breaking mapping project reveals 50 years of land use change along the coast

A view of the coastline from the summit of Golden Cap, at dawn.

A view of the coastline from the summit of Golden Cap, at dawn.

  • Original survey carried out in 1965 to highlight the impact of development on our coastline has been updated to reveal land use changes
  • 94% of coastline considered to be ‘pristine’ 50 years ago is now protected through the National Trust or through the planning system
  • While three quarters (76%) of the coast remains undeveloped, urban/built-up areas have increased by 42% (17,557 hectares), adding the equivalent of a city the size of Manchester to our coastline

One of the biggest mapping projects of the 20th century has been repeated fifty years on by the National Trust to understand how the way that land is used along the coast has changed since 1965.

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First trip of Brownsea Seahorse

Dennis Medlycott wanted to visit Brownsea Island. It was a simple ambition but, since he depends on his electric wheelchair to get about, he could not get onto the boats taking visitors to the island. When he heard that we were about to trial a new boat, ‘Brownsea Seahorse’, which would be able to take disabled visitors to the island, Dennis offered his advice and came to try out the first service. Here he tells his own story of that first trip to the island:

It’s a dream come true that I am actually here in my electric wheelchair on Brownsea Island.
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Response to Navitus Bay Wind Park planning refusal

Old Harry Rocks (C)National Trust

Old Harry Rocks near Studland, part of the Corfe Castle estate, results of the erosion of white chalk cliffs into arches and stacks

The National Trust has welcomed the news that the Navitus Bay Wind Park has been refused planning consent.

‘We always believed that this is the wrong proposal for this location and will lead to damage of a beautiful coastline,’ said Ian Wilson, Assistant Director of Operations for the National Trust in the South West.

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